BikeRaceInfo: Current and historical race results, plus interviews, bikes, travel, and cycling history

find us on Facebook follow us on twitter See our youtube channel The Story of the Giro d'Italia, Volume 1 Cycles BiKyle Nalini custom clothing Schwab Cycles South Salem Cycleworks frames Neugent Cycling Wheels Advertise with us! CycleItalia cycling tours

Search our site:
Email Newsletter icon, E-mail Newsletter icon, Email List icon, E-mail List icon Sign up for our Email Newsletter

Cycling News and Opinions
Unfair and Unbalanced
August, 2009

Back to news and opinion index page for links to archived stories

August 31: Here are the new UCI ranking for riders.

Riders:

1. Alberto Contador (Astana) 527 points
2. Andy Schleck (Saxo) 334
3. Edvald Boasson Hagen (Columbia) 322
4. Roman kreuziger (Liquigas) 310
5. Mark Cavendish (Columbia) 304
6. Alejandro Valverde (Caisse d'Epargne) 295
7. Allan Davis (Quick Step) 249
8. Andreas Kloden (Astana) 232
9. Cadel Evans (Silence-Lotto) 219
10. Denis Menchov (Rabobank) 218
11. Heinrich Haussler (Cervelo) 217
12. Thor Hushovd (Cervelo) 216
13. Frank Schleck (Saxo) 212
14. Luis Leon Sanchez (Caisse d'Epargne) 211
15. Damiano Cunego (Lampre) 202
16. Davide Rebellin (Serramenti PVC-Diquigiovanni) 194
17. Sylvain Chavanel (Quick Step) 194
18. Philippe Gilbert (Silence-lotto) 187
19. Tyler Farrar (Garmin-Slipstream) 181
20. Mikel Astarloza (Euskaltel) 178
21. Stefano Garzelli (Acqua & Sapone) 170
22. Serguei Ivanov (Katusha) 164
23. Simon Gerrans (Cervelo) 160
24. Vladimir Karpets (Katusha) 157
25. Franco Pellizotti (Liquigas) 156
26. Filippo Pozzato (Katusha) 154
27. Lance Armstrong (Astana) 150
28. Fabian Cancellara (Saxo) 148
29. Danilo Di Luca would go here if here if he didn't have that dope thing going on.
30. Robert Gesink (Rabobank) 145

Teams:

1. Astana 1082 points
2. Columbia 956
3. Saxo 898
4. Liquigas 800
5. Cervelo 777
6. Caisse d'Epargne 767
7. Quick step 743
8. Katusha 637
9. Silence-Lotto 599
10. Rabobank 586
11. Garmin-Slipstream 571
12. Euskaltel 407
13. Lampre 400
14. Serramenti-PVC Diquigiovanni 379
15. FDJ 222
16. Ag2r 206
17. Acqua & Sapine 189
18. Milram 164
19. Bouygues telecom 154
20. Cofidis 139
21. LPR 102
22. Vacansoleil 51
23. Fuji-Servetto 47
24. Agritubel 34
25. Skil-Shimano 33

Nations:

1. Spain 1356 points
2. Italy 876
3. Australia 830
4. Germany 694
5. Russia 590
6. Luxembourg 563
7. Belgium 550
8. Norway 538
9. USA 497
10. Great Britain 463
11. France 448
12. Netherlands 407
13. Czech Republic 321
14. Denmark 306
15. Switzerland 253
16. Ireland 133
17. Belarus 115
18. Sweden 105
19. Estonia 98
20. Slovenia 91

August 25: The UCI released it post-GP Ouest-France rankings for riders, teams and nations:

Riders:

1. Alberto Contador (Astana) 527 points
2. Andy Schleck (Saxo) 334
3. Roman Kreuziger (Liquigas) 310
4. Mark Cavendish (Columbia) 304
5. Alejandro Valverde (Caisse d'Epargne) 295
6. Allan Davis (Quick Step) 249
7. Andreas Kloden (Astana) 232
8. Cadel Evans (Silence-Lotto) 219
9. Denis Menchov (Rabobank) 218
10. Heinrich Haussler (Cervelo) 217
11. Thor Hushovd (Cervelo) 210
12. Frank Schleck (Saxo) 212
13. Luis-Leon Sanchez (Caisse d'Epargne) 211
14. Damiano Cunego (Lampre) 202
15. Edvald Boasson Hagen (Columbia) 198
16. Davide Rebellin (Serramenti PVC-Diquigiovanni) 194
17. XXXX This is where Danilo Di Luca's name would be if he weren't in so much trouble over dope.
18. Philippe Gilbert (Silence-Lotto) 187
19. Mikel Astarloza (Euskaltel) 178
20. Stefano Garzelli (Acqua & Sapoine) 170

Teams

1. Astana 1082 points
2. Saxo 898
3. Columbia 832
4. Liquigas 800
5. Cervelo 777
6. Caisse d'Epargne 766
7. Quick Step 644
8. Katusha 637
9. Silence-Lotto 566
10. Garmin-Slipstream 542
11. Rabobank 519
12. Euskaltel 407
13. Lampre 392
14. Serramenti PVC-Diquigiovanni 379
15. LPR 290
16. FDJ 222
17. Ag2r 206
18. Acqua & Sapone 189
19. Milram 164
20. Bouygues Telecom 154

Nations

1. Spain 1,356 points
2. Italy 910
3. Australia 830
4. Germany 694
5. Russia 590
6. Luxembourg 563
7. Belgium 505
8. USA 469
9. Great Britain 462
10. Norway 414
11. France 361
12. Netherlands 341
13. Czech Republic 321
14. Denmark 270
15. Switzerland 253
16. Ireland 133
17. Belarus 111
18. Sweden 105
19. Estonia 98
20. Slovenia 91

August 24: The Vuelta start list is starting to shape up with Alejandro Valverde, Cadel Evans, Kim Kirchen, Samuel Sanchez, Tom Danielson, Damiano Cunego, Ivan Basso, and the Schleck bros. planning to start. Also, Alexandre Vinokourov has managed to get Astana (meaning director Johan Bruyneel, I assume) to agree to put him on the start list. Not coming, Michael Rasmussen who wasn't able to get his paperwork done in time. I'll post the start list with back numbers later in the week on the Vuelta 2009 page. I've redone the Vuelta podium history page and added average speeds and distances for all editions of the Vuelta.

The UCI is trumpeting the lack of doping positives for the 2009 Tour de France. In the Cloud-Cuckooland that the UCI seems to occupy, this is equated with a clean race. No one who saw the climbing rates (VAMS), which in one case was an all-time Tour record for mountain climbing speed, can feel comfortable that this race was clean. The head of the French anti-doping agency, Pierre Bordry thinks there are new generations of dope that have yet to be detected. I'll take Bordry's wisdom, given that he was tossing dopers right and left out of the 2008 Tour, over the feel-good announcements from the UCI.

It looks like we'll get to see regular mano-a-mano sprints between Mark Cavendish and Alessandro Petacchi next year. Petacchi has been stuck on the LPR team which is not a Pro Tour squad. LPR generally hasn't been invited to the big races. Petacchi has departed LPR with a year left to go on his contract and moved to Lampre for 2010. I hope we get rivals, Columbia and Lampre, doing drag-racing lead-out trains to the finishing line before unleashing their speedsters. That would be so cool...

The UCI has done something useful, releasing the rider rankings. I'll get them up tomorrow. Alberto Contador remains the world number one rider, Astana the number one team and Spain the leader among cycling nations.

August 21: Earlier Larry Theobald had listed the reasons why the Giro d'Italia is the greatest race. Padraig of Red Kite Prayer now counters with why the Tour de France remains number 1:

"When it comes to sports, cycling has been my favorite since long before indexed shifting existed. And when it comes to sporting events, the Tour de France has been my favorite since, well, since I found out about it.

"Let me say that Larry has me at a disadvantage; aside from being a good guy, Larry is also knowledgeable. In the 18 years I've known him, he has proven to be better versed in all things cycling than even some of the most dedicated riders I know. He's got far more years seeing the Giro and the Tour than I do, but I've got something you can't argue: unconditional love." Here's the rest of his essay

August 20: Here's an updated list of rider tranfer rumors, some of which might actually be true.

Alberto Contador might feel like playing Robert Johnson's Cross Road Blues. Astana seems to think that Contador's having signed a contract that goes through the 2010 season obligates Señor Contador to race for them. Astana has made it very clear that they intend to see Contador suited up in an Astana kit when he races next year. Contador has made it clear he wants out.

Lance Armstrong (Astana) to Radio Shack
Alessandro Ballan (Lampre) to Radio Shack (?)
Janez Brajkovic (Astana) to Radio Shack (?)
Graeme Brown (Rabobank) stays with Rabobank
Marzio Bruseghin (Lampre) to Caisse d'Epargne
Marcus Burghardt (Columbia) to SKY (?)
Anthony Charteau (Caisse d'Epargne) to Bouygues Telecom
Alberto Contador (Astana) to Caisse d'Epargne (??)
Laurent Didier (Designa Kokken) to Saxo
Julien El Fares (Cofidis) stays with Cofidis
Juan Antonio Flecha (Rabobank) to SKY (?)
Simon Gerrans (Cervelo) to (?)
Edvald Boasson Hagen (Columbia) to SKY (?)
George Hincapie (Columbia) to BMC (?)
Chris Horner (Astana) to Radio Shack (?)
Robert Hunter (Barloworld) to Garmin-Slipstream
Thor Hushovd (Cervelo) stays with Cervelo
Kevin Ista (Agritubel) to Cofidis
Servais Knaven (Milram) stays with Milram
Karsten Kroon (Saxo) to Milram (?)
Levi Leipheimer (Astana) to Radio Shack
Thomas Lovkvist (Columbia) to SKY (?)
Daniel Martin (Garmin-Slipstream) stays with Garmin and is not likely to go to SKY as rumored
Tony Martin (Columbia) stays with Columbia
David Moncoutie (Cofidis) stays with Cofidis
Christophe Moreau (Agritubel) to Caisse d'Epargne
Danilo Napolitano (Katusha) stays with Katusha
Grischa Niermann (Rabobank) stays with Rabobank
Sergio Paulinho (Astana) to Radio Shack
Alessandro Petacchi (LPR) to Lampre (?)
Yaroslav Popovych (Astana) to Radio Shack (?)
Morris Possoni (Columbia) to SKY (?)
Joaquin Rodriguez (Caisse d'Epargne) to Katusha
Emanuele Sella (1-year doping suspension) to Carmiooro
Nicki Sorensen (Saxo) stays with Saxo
Constantsin Siutsou (Columbia) to Caisse d'Epargne
Mauricio Soler (Barloworld) to Caisse d'Epargne
Gert Steemans (Katusha) to Bouygues Telecom or Milram (?)
Rein Taarramae (Cofidis) stays with Cofidis
Alexandre Vinokourov (2 years in the wilderness) to Astana

August 17: Following the Vattenfall Cyclassics, the UCI released its new rankings for riders, teams and nations:

Riders:

1. Alberto Contador (Astana) 527 points
2. Andy Schleck (Saxo) 334
3. Roman Kreuziger (Liquigas) 310
4. Mark Cavendish (Columbia) 304
5. Alejandro Valverde (Caisse d'Epargne) 295
6. Allan Davis (Quick Step) 249
7. Andreas Kloden (Astana) 232
8. Cadel Evans (Silence-Lotto) 219
9. Denis Menchov (Rabobank) 218
10. Heinrich Haussler (Cervelo) 217
12. Frank Schleck (Saxo) 212
13. Damiano Cunego (Lampre) 202
14. Edvald Boasson Hagen (Columbia) 198
15. Davide Rebellin (Serramenti PVC-Diquigiovanni) 194
16. Luis-Leon Sanchez (Caisse d'Epagne) 189
17. The UCI has a blank spot here for the very disgraced Danilo Di Luca because of his doping positive/investigation.
18. Philippe Gilbert (Silence-Lotto) 187
19. Mike Astarloza (Euskaltel) 178
20. Stefano Garzelli (Acqua & Sapone) 170
21. Serguei Ivanov (Katusha) 164
22. Vladimir Karpets (Katusha) 164
23. Franco Pellizotti (Liquigas) 156
24. Filippo Pozzato (Katusha) 154
25. Tyler Farrar (Garmin-Slipstream) 153
26. Lance Armstrong (Astana) 150

Teams:

1. Astana 1082 points
2. Saxo 898
3. Columbia 832
4. Liquigas 800
5. Caisse d'Epargne 744
6. Cervelo 697
7. Quick Step 644
8. Katusha 637
9. Silence-Lotto 566
10. Rabobank 513
11. Garmin-Slipstream 512
12. Euskaltel 407
13. Lampre 392
14. Serramenti PVC-Diquigiovanni 379
15. LPR 209
16. Ag2r 206
17. FDJ 192
18. Acqua & Sapone 189
19. Milram 164
20. Cofidis

Nations

1. Spain 1334 points
2. Italy 910
3. Australia 750
4. Germany 689
5. Russia 590
6. Luxembourg 563
7. Belgium 505
8. USA 469
9. Great Britain 462
10. Norway 414
11. Netherlands 341
12. Czech Republic 321
13. France 301
14. Denmark 270
15. Switzerland 253
16. Belarus 111
17. Sweden 105
18. Ireland 103
19. Estonia 98
20. Slovenia 91

August 14: Which is better, the Tour de France or the Giro d'Italia? Larry Theobald of CycleItalia has his say.

Il Giro vs Le Tour

"At the risk of getting the Tour faithful wound up, I'll explain why I believe the Giro d'Italia is a better event than Le Tour de France.

First some background. Yours truly and wife Heather worked for most of the 1990s with an operation that arguably pioneered the "race-chasing" cycling vacation. We followed both the Tour and Giro around their respective countries, hauling our clients in 9-passenger mini-vans with bikes mounted on top, enjoying the thrill of riding on the actual race route mere hours before the pros did battle on the same climbs. Both programs used similarly-priced hotels and followed similar itineraries. We also have continued when possible, to see selected individual stages of both events as part of our current venture, CycleItalia, so our experience is not totally based on what some may call "ancient history".

"Our experience coincided with the Giro d'Italia organizer RCS' efforts to open their race to a more international audience. Andy Hampsten won in 1988 while Greg LeMond often used La Corsa Rosa to hone his form for the upcoming Tour. The old days, along with claims of designing or even modifying a course to suit the national hero were coming to a close, even if the idea that somehow Francesco Moser was blown to a time-trail victory by a TV helicopter were dubious at best. By the early 1990s there was again talk of "doing the double"-winning both the Giro and Tour in the same year. "BigMig" Indurain did just that in 1992 and 1993 while Marco Pantani did it again in 1998, matching the earlier feats of Coppi, Merckx, Roche and others. The Giro d'Italia was again a truly international race. Why do I think it's a better race? Read on."

Better roads. I believe it was Swiss pro Alex Zülle who explained he liked racing the Giro because Italian roads were so much better than most. What he may not have known is many of the roads used in the race get repaved just for the event! One year we were mapping a route in the Alps over the Colle Fauniera just a few days before La Corsa Rosa was to ascend the tortuous climb. We had to pause a few times as fresh asphalt was spread and rolled smooth on the upper slopes of the road! Nowadays, when riding or mapping a route in Italy with pavement that needs some work, the running joke between us is "the Giro needs to come here" because we know that's a sure-fire way to see the road repaved.

Read the rest of Larry's piece here

August 13: We'll synergize our unfair and unbalanced approach by dealing in straight rumor and innuendo. Right now there is a frenzy of negotiation as the teams work to improve their rosters for the 2010 season. UCI rules say that the riders and teams are not supposed to comment on a 2010 signing until September 1. But there is a lot of scuttlebutt out there regarding where some key riders are going. Here's what's being floated out there. The team in parenthesis is the rider's current squad. None of this should be treated as any more than an (un)educated guess.

Lance Armstrong (Astana) to Radio Shack
Alessandro Ballan (Lampre) to Radio Shack (?)
Janez Brajkovic (Astana) to Radio Shack (?)
Graeme Brown (Rabobank) stays with Rabobank
Marzio Bruseghin (Lampre) to Caisse d'Epargne
Marcus Burghardt (Columbia) to SKY (?)
Alberto Contador (Astana) to Caisse d'Epargne (??)
Laurent Didier (Designa Kokken) to Saxo
Julien El Fares (Cofidis) stays with Cofidis
Juan Antonio Flecha (Rabobank) to SKY (?)
Simon Gerrans (Cervelo) to (?)
Edvald Boasson Hagen (Columbia) to SKY (?)
George Hincapie (Columbia) to BMC (?)
Chris Horner (Astana) to Radio Shack (?)
Robert Hunter (Barloworld) to Garmin-Slipstream
Kevin Ista (Agritubel) to Cofidis
Levi Leipheimer (Astana) to Radio Shack
Thomas Lovkvist (Columbia) to SKY (?)
Daniel Martin (Garmin-Slipstream) stays with Garmin and is not likely to go to SKY as rumored
Tony Martin (Columbia) stays with Columbia
David Moncoutie (Cofidis) stays with Cofidis
Christophe Moreau (Agritubel) to Caisse d'Epargne
Danilo Napolitano (Katusha) stays with Katusha
Grischa Niermann (Rabobank) stays with Rabobank
Sergio Paulinho (Astana) to Radio Shack
Yaroslav Popovych (Astana) to Radio Shack (?)
Morris Possoni (Columbia) to SKY (?)
Joaquin Rodriguez (Caisse d'Epargne) to Katusha
Nicki Sorensen (Saxo) stays with Saxo
Constantsin Siutsou (Columbia) to Caisse d'Epargne
Mauricio Soler (Barloworld) to Caisse d'Epargne
Gert Steemans (Katusha) to Bouygues Telecom (?)
Rein Taarramae (Cofidis) stays with Cofidis
Alexandre Vinokourov (2 years in the wilderness) to Astana

August 12: Put a fork in him. He's done. Danilo Di Luca's LPR Brakes team has sacked the 2007 Giro winner after 2 of his 2009 Giro "B" samples confirmed the presence of EPO-CERA in his system. Wait, there's more. The team is also planning on suing Di Luca because of the damage his doping has done to its image. The 33-year old racer, who has had a questionable doping history, is facing a potential lifetime racing ban if his earlier suspension for hanging around a notorious doping doctor is considered a true doping suspension. Di Luca plans to fight the charges and insists he is innocent. I have come to value the output of a mass spectrograph (or whatever they use now) more highly than the word of accused dopers in these cases. Rarely has the mass spectrogrpah broken my heart by later being shown to have been wrong (but it has happened). I wish I could say the same about racers.

Caisse d'Epargne is breaking open its piggy bank as it tries to come up with enough S&H Green stamps to sign Alberto Contador. Contador's contract has another year to run but it does have a buy-out clause. I'll bet they will not be cheap. I'm guessing that it will be somewhere about the equivalent of the Gross National Product of Austria. Caisse d'Epargne is looking for another sponsor to help defray the cost of signing the man who has, by the age of 26, won 4 Grand Tours.

Alexandre Vinokourov, who won the stage 3B time trial in the Tour de l'Ain abandoned during the tough stage 4 with it hilltop finish atop the Col du Grand Colombier. Chris Horner went into the final stage with 19-second lead but Rein Taaramae (Cofidis) distanced him by 37 seconds on the final climb, giving the Estonian the overall win and leaving Horner (Astana) second at 25 seconds.

August 8: Danilo Di Luca's 2009 Giro "B" samples confirm the initial finding that Di Luca used EPO-CERA. Di Luca denies that he used EPO and his lawyer has vowed a vigorous fight.

August 7: If We Can't See It, It's Not There Dept. Several high-profile riders in the 2008 Giro later showed up in other races positive for EPO-CERA. It's clear that use of of the banned blood-booster EPO-CERA is not rare. The obvious move, one anyone wanting to have a clean race would make, would be to go back and re-test the 2008 Giro urine samples and root out the cheaters and do everything possible to award the prizes to the riders racing clean.

But we are forced to deal with the Cloud-Cuckoo-Land of the UCI which runs professional racing and dope-testing in particular. Last fall the UCI said (in a perfect imitation of a Spanish magistrate trying to hide Puerto evidence) that the only reason to do retrospective testing would be if there were some obvious reason to look for doping. Meaning, of course, that at the time of the statement they asked us to pretend to believe there was no reason to perform the retrospective tests. The UCI should come up with a higher quality of what I am supposed to call manure because my mother might read this posting.

On August 5 The Killer, Danilo Di Luca, had his third positive for EPO-CERA from the 2009 Giro. That's 3 positives from one stage race. Now, I must say that Di Luca maintains his innocence and as I write this, the "B" counter samples have not come back confirming his use of EPO.

I believe that almost immediately after the third positive the UCI said it wanted to retest the 2008 Giro urine samples which, since May of this year, have been held by the Italian police. I figure there are 2 possible explanations for the UCI's changed stance. 1: The Italian police are going to test the samples anyway, so why not make a good show and go along, pretending that this is what they wanted all along. I love make-believe. Or, 2: they are so shaken by the disgrace of Di Luca, who was the 2007 Giro winner and 2009 Giro second-place, that they figure that perhaps a little testing wouldn't be too bad. I'm leaning towards number one and believe they would really rather no one bothered his little head about any of this doping stuff.

Doping riders are not harmless scamps performing pranks. Nor should they be characterized, as Lance Armstrong said about David Millar (who has paid the price for his misdeeds and is working hard for reform), who was "caught with his hand in the cookie jar". They are cheaters who corrupt the sport, endanger their own lives and health and the lives of others who feel they must dope to stay competitive. And they are criminals who flaunt the laws of nations.

One can't but feel that the cycle racing industry is more concerned about the short-term effects of scandal rather than the long-term payoff of a clean sport.

August 5: Alexandre Vinokourov raced in France in a 45-kilometer criterium for the first time since his 2007 suspension for doping (see August 3 posting below). He has not yet become part of his old Astana team, and as an Astana spokesman predicted, Vino was not wearing Astana kit. He wore a jersey with a picture of his favorite racer, Alexandre Vinokourov, and the motto, "Vino 4 Ever".

He did say he planned to race the Tour L'Ain which runs from August 9 to August 12, presumably with the Astana team. He also made a public appeal to Alberto Contador to stay with the Astana squad, promising to build the Kazakh outfit around the Spanish racer. Vinokourov further pledged to work for Contador in the future.

August 3:

Alexandre Vinokourov has completed his 2-year racing suspension for doping-while-stupid. In the 2007 Tour he was positive for homologous blood doping. That's the very easy to detect as well as extrememly dangerous offense of using someone else's blood. By the way, both the 1984 USA Olympic cycling team and Francesco Moser when he broke Eddy Merckx's World Hour Record performed that very same act, but it wasn't against the rules at the time, just against common medical sense. Vino is planning to race today (Tuesday) in a 45-kilometer criterium at Castillon-la-Bataille in France. Astana says he will not be wearing their colors at the race.

The UCI released its post-San Sebastian Classic rankings. The text in quotes is from the UCI site:

"03.08.2009

Description: Roman Kreuziger may not have won the Clásica Ciclista San Sebastian-San Sebastian, but his second place behind Spaniard Carlos Barredo has had important consequences for his position in the UCI World Rankings.

The Liquigas rider's new total of 310 points means he has moved from fifth to third overall behind World Rankings leader Alberto Contador (Astana), whose total of 527 points remains unchanged. Andy Schleck (Saxo Bank) remains in second overall with 334.

As a result of Kreuziger's rapid rise through the ranks, Great Britain's Mark Cavendish (Columbia-HTC) slides from third to fourth, and Alejandro Valverde (Caisse d'Epargne) drops from fourth to fifth. "

I see that Spain, which seems to be in a constant ongoing doping crisis and appears to work harder than any other nation in covering up chemically aided racing is the number 1 racing nation. France, with its rigorous testing, is not even in the top 10. Also, no French team is in the top 10. Maybe Bernard Hinault is right and French racers are lazy. I like Hinault's bluntness, but I'm not buying that explanation.

Riders:

1. Alberto Contador (Astana) 527 points
2. Andy Schleck (Saxo) 334
3. Roman Kreuziger (Liquigas) 310
4. Mark Cavendish (Columbia) 304
5. Alejandro Valverde (Caisse d'Epargne)
6. Andreas Kloden (Astana) 232
7. Cadel Evans (Silence-Lotto) 219
8. Denis Menchov (Rabobank) 218
9. Heinrich Haussler (Cervelo) 217
10. Thor Hushovd (Cervelo) 216
11. Frank Schleck (Saxo) 212
12. Allan Davis (Quick Step) 205
13. Damiano Cunego (Lampre) 202
14. Davide Rebellin (Serramenti PVC-Diquigiovanni) 194
15. Luis-Leon Sanchez (Caisse d'Epargne) 189
24. Lance Armstrong (Astana) 150

Teams:

1. Astana 1082 points
2. Saxo 863
3. Liquigas 800
4. Columbia 750
5. Caisse d'Epargne 710
6. Cervelo 697
7. Katusha 637
8. Quick Step 600
9. Silence-Lotto 566
10. Rabobank 491

Nations:

1. Spain 1334 Points
2. Italy 910
3. Australia 706
4. Germany 661
5. Russia 5990
6. Luxembourg 563
7. Belgium 505
8. Great Britain 462
9. USA 389
10. Norway 332