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1923 Giro d'Italia

11th edition: May 23 - June 10

Results, stages with running GC, photos and history

1922 Giro | 1924 Giro | Giro d'Italia Database | 1923 Giro Quick Facts | 1923 Giro d'Italia Final GC | Stage results with running GC | Teams | The Story of the 1923 Giro d'Italia |


Quick Facts

3202 km raced at an average speed of 25.895 km/hr

96 or 97 starters (no one knows for sure) and 38 classified finishers.

While Girardengo was never able to gain significant time on Giovanni Brunero, he did dominate the sprints. Girardengo won an astonishing eight out the the years ten stages.

This was the only Giro entry for Ottavio Bottecchia, who won the Tour de France in 1924 and 1925. Bottecchia was the highest placed independent rider.

The top four riders were from Piedmont, the era's dominant racing region.


1923 Giro d'Italia Complete Final General Classification:

  1. maglia rosaCostante Girardengo (Maino): 122hr 58min 17sec
  2. Giovanni Brunero (Legnano-Pirelli) @ 37sec
  3. Bartolomeo Aymo (Atala) @ 10min 25sec
  4. Federico Gay (Atala) @ 41min 25sec
  5. Ottavio Bottecchia (independent) @ 45min 49sec
  6. Giuseppe Enrico (Legnano-Pirelli) @ 49min 30sec
  7. Michele Gordini (Ganna) @ 52min 15sec
  8. Emilio Petiva (Maino) @ 55min 17sec
  9. Giovanni Trentarossi (Berrettini) @ 1hr 0min 29sec
  10. Angelo Gremo (Maino) @ 1hr 12min 6sec
  11. Alfredo Sivocci (Legnano) @ 1hr 16min 33sec
  12. Pierino Bestetti (Berettini) @ 1hr 20min 58sec
  13. Secondo Martinetto @ 1hr 21min 54sec
  14. Giovanni Tragella @ 1hr 41min 51sec
  15. Guido Masseri @ 1hr 52min 42sec
  16. Ottavio Pratesi (Lygie) @ 1hr 53min 39sec
  17. Saverio Datardi @ 1hr 58min 38sec
  18. Giovanni Rossignoli @ 2hr 21min 44sec
  19. Pietro Fasoli @ 2hr 58min 57sec
  20. Angiolo Marchi @ 3hr 11min 0sec
  21. Alessandro Tonani (Maino) @ 3hr 17min 22sec
  22. Angelo Veneis @ 3hr 28min 29sec
  23. Pasquale Di Pietro @ 3hr 59min 51sec
  24. Gianbattista Gilli @ 4hr 8min 49sec
  25. Luigi Lucotti (Maino) @ 4hr 28min 36sec
  26. Ugo Ruggeri @ 4hr 36min 23sec
  27. Domenico Schierano (independent) @ 4hr 37min 0sec
  28. Otello Massaro @ 5hr 31min 50sec
  29. Enrico Sala @ 5hr 45min 0sec
  30. Giuseppe Ruffoni @ 6hr 10min 56sec
  31. Menotti Vaccari @ 6hr 13min 13sec
  32. Romolo Lazzaretti @ 6hr 35min 25sec
  33. Arturo Ferrario @ 7hr 58min 21sec
  34. Antonio Buelli @ 9hr 28min 7sec
  35. Clemente Canepari @ 8hr 59min 38sec
  36. Telesforo Benaglia @ 10hr 46min 52sec
  37. Giuseppe Borghi @ 11hr 9min 48sec
  38. Giusto Scherl @ 11hr 51min 19sec

Winning team: Legnano


1923 Giro stage results with running GC:

Stage 1: Wednesday, May 23, Milano - Torino, 328 km

climbsAscents: Monte Ceneri (559m), La Serra (595m)

  1. Costante Girardengo: 12hr 11min 0sec
  2. Pietro Linari s.t.
  3. Federico Gay s.t.
  4. Giovanni Brunero s.t.
  5. Bartolomeo Aymo s.t.
  6. Camillo Arduino s.t.
  7. Ottavio Bottecchia s.t.
  8. Giuseppe Enrici s.t.
  9. Emilio Petiva @ 1min 45sec
  10. Angelo Gremo s.t.

GC after Stage 1: Same as stage results

Stage 2: Friday, May 25, Torino - Genova, 312 km

climbsAscents: Bossolasco (771m), Montezemolo (734m), Scoffera (678m)

  1. Bartolomeo Aymo: 16hr 48min 25sec
  2. Pietro Linari @ 55sec
  3. Federico Gay s.t.
  4. Luigi Lucotti s.t.
  5. Piero Bestetti s.t.
  6. Camillo Arduino s.t.
  7. Costante Girardengo @ 1min 15sec
  8. Giovanni Brunero s.t.
  9. Alfredo Cominetti @ 5min 55sec
  10. Emilio Petiva @ 7min 25sec

GC after stage 2:

  1. Bartolomeo Aymo: 24hr 16min 25sec
  2. Pietro Linari s.t.
  3. Federico Gay s.t.
  4. Camillo Arduino @ 55sec
  5. Costante Girardengo @ 1min 15sec
  6. Giovanni Brunero s.t.
  7. Emilio Petiva @ 9min 10sec
  8. Ottavio Bottecchia @ 12min 10sec
  9. Pierino Bestetti @ 12min 55sec
  10. Alfredo Cominetti @ 17min 20sec

Stage 3: Sunday, May 27, Genova - Firenze, 265 km

climbAscent: Bracco (613m)

  1. Costante Girardengo: 10hr 39min 36sec
  2. Pietro Linari s.t.
  3. Paride Ferrari s.t.
  4. Alfredo Sivocci s.t.
  5. Michele Gordini s.t.
  6. Pierino Bestetti s.t.
  7. Ottavio Bottecchia s.t.
  8. Luigi Magnotti s.t.
  9. 49 riders, all given same time and place, ex aequo

GC after Stage 3:

  1. Bartolomeo Aymo: 34hr 56min 1sec
  2. Pietro Linari @ 55sec
  3. Federico Gay s.t.
  4. Giovanni Brunero @ 1min 0sec
  5. Costante Girardengo s.t.
  6. Emilio Petiva @ 7min 35sec
  7. Ottavio Bottecchia @ 12min 10sec
  8. Secondo Martinetto, Paride Ferrari and Michele Gordini tied @ 13min 55sec

Stage 4: Tuesday, May 29, Firenze - Roma, 289 km

climbsAscents: Radicofani (896m), Cimini (814m)

  1. Costante Girardengo: 17hr 32min 34sec
  2. Federico Gay s.t.
  3. Michele Gordini s.t.
  4. Giovanni Trentarossi @ 1sec
  5. Bartolomeo Aymo @ 4sec
  6. Giovanni Brunero @ 21sec
  7. Ottavio Bottecchia @ 58sec
  8. Camillo Arduino @ 1min 28sec
  9. Pasquale Di Pietro @ 2min 17sec
  10. Emilio Petiva @ 3min 6sec

GC after Stage 4:

  1. Bartolomeo Aymo: 46hr 30min 39sec
  2. Federico Gay @ 51sec
  3. Costante Girardengo @ 56sec
  4. Giovanni Brunero @ 1min 15sec
  5. Emilio Petiva @ 10min 37sec
  6. Ottavio Bottecchia @ 11min 9sec
  7. Michele Gordini @ 11min 56sec
  8. Secondo Martinetto @ 15min 42sec
  9. Angelo Gremo @ 18min 14sec
  10. Giovanni Trentarossi @ 21min 10sec

Stage 5: Thursday, May 31, Roma - Napoli, 281 km

  1. Costante Girardengo: 11hr 15min 13sec
  2. Luigi Lucotti s.t.
  3. Federico Gay s.t.
  4. Bartolomeo Aymo s.t.
  5. Giovanni Brunero s.t.
  6. Emilio Petiva s.t.
  7. Pierino Bestetti s.t.
  8. Luigi Magnotti s.t.
  9. Alessandro Tonani s.t.
  10. Severino Dartardi @ 4sec

GC after Stage 5:

  1. Bartolomeo Aymo: 57hr 45min 50sec
  2. Federico Gay @ 51sec
  3. Costante Girardengo @ 56sec
  4. Giovanni Brunero @ 1min 27sec
  5. Emilio Petiva @ 1min 37sec
  6. Ottavio Bottecchia @ 13min 10sec
  7. Michele Gordini @ 13min 57sec
  8. Secondo Martinetto @ 17min 43sec
  9. Giuseppe Enrici @ 24min 19sec
  10. Angelo Gremo @ 26min 53sec

Stage 6: Saturday, June 2, Napoli - Chieti, 283 km

climbsAscents: Vinchiaturo (630m), Rionero Sannitico (1,052m), Fontanella (1,280m)

  1. Costante Girardengo: 10hr 55min 56sec
  2. Giovanni Brunero s.t.
  3. Giovanni Trentarossi @ 7min 51sec
  4. Bartolomeo Aymo @ 8min 27sec
  5. Giuseppe Enrici @ 23min 11sec
  6. Ottavio Bottecchia @ 32min 39sec
  7. Alfredo Sivocci @ 36min 21sec
  8. Michele Gordini s.t.
  9. Pierino Bestetti @ 41min 28sec
  10. Luigi Lucotti s.t.

GC after Stage 6:

  1. Costante Girardengo: 68hr 42min 37sec
  2. Giovanni Brunero @ 36sec
  3. Bartolomeo Aymo @ 7min 36sec
  4. Federico Gay @ 40min 28sec
  5. Giovanni Trentarossi @ 43min 33sec
  6. Ottavio Bottecchia @ 43min 58sec
  7. Giuseppe Enrici @ 46min 39sec
  8. Michele Gordini @ 49min 47sec
  9. Emilio Petiva @ 51min 14sec
  10. Angelo Gremo @ 1hr 9min 6sec

Stage 7: Monday, June 4, Chieti - Bologna, 383 km

  1. Costante Girardengo: 17hr 20min 15sec
  2. Alessandro Tonani s.t.
  3. Alfredo Sivocci s.t.
  4. Luigi Lucotti s.t.
  5. Federico Gay s.t.
  6. Giovanni Brunero s.t.
  7. Bartolomeo Aymo s.t.
  8. Pierino Bestetti @ 1sec
  9. Emilio Petiva s.t.
  10. Michele Gordini s.t.

GC after Stage 7:

  1. Costante Girardengo: 82hr 48min 52sec
  2. Giovanni Brunero @ 36sec
  3. Bartolomeo Aymo @ 7min 36sec
  4. Federico Gay @ 40min 28sec
  5. Ottavio Bottecchia @ 44min 0sec
  6. Giuseppe Enrico @ 46min 41sec
  7. Michele Gordini @ 49min 48sec
  8. Emilio Petiva @ 51min 15sec
  9. Giovanni Trentarossi @ 56min 5sec
  10. Angelo Gremo @ 1hr 9min 8sec

Stage 8: Wednesday, June 6, Bologna - Trieste, 362 km

  1. Costante Girardengo: 14hr 43min 55sec
  2. Michele Gordini s.t.
  3. Domenico Schierano s.t.
  4. Federico Gay @ 2min 0sec
  5. Bartolomeo Aymo s.t.
  6. Giovanni Brunero s.t.
  7. Giuseppe Enrici s.t.
  8. Ottavio Bottecchia s.t.
  9. Angelo Gremo @ 2min 3sec
  10. Alfredo Sivocci @ 2min 15sec

GC after Stage 8:

  1. Costante Girardengo: 97hr 42min 47sec
  2. Giovanni Bunero @ 37sec
  3. Bartolomeo Aymo @ 7min 36sec
  4. Federico Gay @ 41min 28sec
  5. Ottavio Bottecchia @ 43min 0sec
  6. Giuseppe Enrici @ 46min 41sec
  7. Michele Gordini @ 49min 28sec
  8. Emilio Petiva @ 53min 39sec
  9. Giovanni Trentarossi @ 1hr 0min 27sec
  10. Angelo Gremo @ 1hr 11min 29sec

Stage 9: Friday, june 8, Trieste - Mantova, 370 km

  1. Alfredo Sivocci: 12hr 43min 50sec
  2. Costante Girardengo s.t.
  3. Michele Gordini s.t.
  4. Arturo Ferrario s.t.
  5. Federico Gay s.t.
  6. Giovanni Brunero s.t.
  7. Pierino Bestetti s.t.
  8. Emilio Petiva s.t.
  9. @ 2sec: 27 riders given same time and place

GC after Stage 9:

  1. Costante Girardengo: 110hr 26min 37sec
  2. Giovanni Brunero @ 37sec
  3. Bartolomeo Aymo @ 7min 38sec
  4. Federico Gay @ 41min 28sec
  5. Ottavio Bottecchia @ 43min 2sec
  6. Giuseppe Enrici @ 46min 43sec
  7. Michele Gordini @ 49min 28sec
  8. Emilio Petiva @ 52min 30sec
  9. Giovanni Trentarossi @ 1hr 0min 29sec
  10. Angelo Gremo @ 1hr 11min 31sec

10th and Final Stage: Sunday, June 10, Mantova - Milano, 341 km

climbsAscents: Bezzecca (697m), San Eusebio (574m)

  1. Costante Girardengo: 12hr 31min 40sec
  2. Alessandro Tonani s.t.
  3. Pierino Bestetti s.t.
  4. Federico Gay st.
  5. Arturo Ferrario s.t.
  6. Giovanni Tragella s.t.
  7. Giovanni Trentarossi s.t.
  8. Giovanni Brunero s.t.
  9. Alfredo Sivocci @ 35sec
  10. Angelo Gremo s.t.

1923 Giro d'Italia Complete Final General Classification


Teams:

Atala
Legnano
Maino


The Story of the 1923 Giro d'Italia

This excerpt is from "The Story of the Giro d'Italia", Volume 1. If you enjoy it we hope you will consider purchasing the book, either print or electronic. The Amazon link here will make either purchase easy.

Girardengo won Milan–San Remo in the spring, beating Belloni, Brunero, Aymo and Giuseppe Azzini in an eleven-man sprint. All four of the big names had made the winning break, but Girardengo continued to assert his superiority.

The great Giro rematch came to pass. Girardengo, Belloni, Aymo and Brunero were included among the 96 starters. Pietro Linari, a square-jawed rider with an impressive sprint who had caught the eye of La Gazzetta’s writers in 1922 was also on the start list.

Legendary rider Ottavio Bottecchia (logically so named because he had seven older siblings. Italians can be so practical!) made what would be his only appearance in the Giro. Fixing the Giro’s status between the wars as a regional race, from 1923 to 1927 there would be no foreign entrants.

The ten-stage 1923 edition was run counter-clockwise with the first stage being 328 kilometers from Milan to Turin. Girardengo won the eight-man sprint against Linari, Brunero, Aymo, Bottecchia and Federico Gay while Belloni abandoned. Most of the rest of the peloton finished more than eleven minutes back. The first selection had been made.

Arrival of the riders at the end of the first stage

Arrival of the riders at the end of the first stage.

Aymo managed to gap Linari, Gay and Lucotti by 55 seconds in the second stage into Genoa. Girardengo and Brunero lost 75 seconds while poor Bottecchia lost twelve more  minutes. Aymo was now the leader with Linari second and Gay third, all with the same time. Girardengo was fourth at 75 seconds.

The third stage was a mess with 55 men all sprinting for the line in Florence. The judges called it for Girardengo, but the Florentines were outraged and insisted their man Linari had won. To remain safe, the judges called it a giant tie and once again sent the problem off to the Italian Federation. Two days later with the race now safely in Rome, the federation gave the stage victory to Girardengo.

Girardengo was on a tear, winning the fourth and the fifth stages. The race was between five men:
1. Bartolomeo Aymo
2. Federico Gay @ 51 seconds
3. Costante Girardengo @ 56 seconds
4. Giovanni Brunero @ 1 minute 27 seconds
5. Emilio Petiva @ 1 minute 37 seconds
6. Ottavio Bottecchia @ 13 minutes 10 seconds

The sixth stage went through the same Cinquemiglia Plateau on the way to Chieti where Girardengo had made a cross in the dust before abandoning back in 1921. Brunero and Aymo took the opportunity to attack at that point, but Girardengo wasn’t the injured, exhausted man he had been two years before. This time Brunero and Girardengo escaped together and Girardengo won the uphill sprint into Chieti with Aymo losing over eight minutes. Girardengo was the new leader with Brunero 36 seconds back.

Gira won the next two stages, keeping his lead while Brunero remained in second, now at 37 seconds.

Riders crossing the Piave river

Riders crossing the Piave river

Sivocci managed to win the ninth stage but Girardengo won the final run into Milan. That made eight out of ten stages for the campionissimo. In 1919 he had astonished the sporting world by winning seven stages but in 1923 he had managed to exceed even that high standard.

Costante Girardengo

Ah, the glamor of bike racing. The winner of the 1923 Giro d'Italia, Costante Girardengo.

Final 1923 Giro d’Italia General Classification:
1. Costante Girardengo (Maino) 122 hours 58 minutes 17 seconds
2. Giovanni Brunero (Legnano-Pirelli) @ 37 seconds
3. Bartolomeo Aymo (Atala) @ 10 minutes 25 seconds
4. Federico Gay (Atala) @ 41 minutes 25 seconds
5. Ottavio Bottecchia (independent) @ 45 minutes 49 seconds

The top four placers were from Piedmont, a trend that started with the heroic era and continued into the 1960s. All things seem to come and go and today Piedmont doesn’t produce champions with the wonderful fecundity of the past. Perhaps her time will come again.

It is said that Girardengo was at his greatest from 1912 to 1920. His list of major victories is magnificent. Since 1923 was his last Giro victory let’s take a look at what he was able to accomplish despite being robbed of his best years by the war:
he had two Giro overall wins (1919, 1923) and a total of 30 Giro stages;
he won Milan–San Remo six times. Only Eddy Merckx has exceeded that total;
he was Champion of Italy an amazing nine times;
he won Milan–Turin, Giro dell’Emilia and Rome–Naples–Rome each five times.

Bottecchia, who in his short life would not enter the Giro again, was first among the independent riders. He went on that year to take second in the Tour while riding on the powerful Automoto team, and then won the Tour with ease in 1924 and 1925, becoming the first Italian to win the Tour de France, and one of the few competitors to take the lead from its first stage and hold it to the end.
Bottecchia was outspoken in his left-wing political views, and given the era, one must say courageously so. He made no secret of his hostile feelings about Mussolini’s consolidation of power. In 1927 he was found dead in a vineyard, his skull and other bones broken. His bike was parked a small distance away, undamaged. There have been lots of theories and even an unbelievable confession or two, but what was obviously a brutal murder was never solved. Most (rational) theorists believe Fascist thugs wanted to silence a famous athlete with unsavory political views and murdered Bottecchia while he was on a training ride.